A Guide to Using Curation 2020 Diary

This how-to guide will show you exactly how to get the most out of your Curation 2020 diary. We’ve included a written guide along with video tutorials (if reading isn’t your jam) and plenty of examples to get you started.

 

Jump to:

Self-Care Menu
Bucket List
Mission Statement
Habit Curator
Savings Curator
Pre Week Planner
Weekly Spread
2020 Reflection

 

Self-Care Menu

Consider this your personal self-care directory.

Categorising these activities makes it easier for you to choose an activity based on your current needs and how much time you want to dedicate on any given day.

It also alleviates decision fatigue when you’re unsure of the best way to recharge in ten minutes.

Naturally, there will be activities that fall into all three categories. To avoid duplication, consider how each ritual makes you feel. What part of your wellbeing does the activity contribute to most? 

For example, yoga is celebrated for its many mind, body and spiritual benefits. However, the mental health benefits may be of greater significance to you, so you would add that to the mind section. 

Start by brainstorming practical self-care rituals that you can complete in:

10 minutes or less: These are quick and simple activities that can be done anywhere, at any time. 

30 minutes or less: These activities require a little more time investment and may need to be pre-planned and scheduled into your day. Some of these activities can be done during your lunch break or form part of your morning ritual. 

60 minutes or more: These activities require the most time investment and generally need to be pre-planned and scheduled into your week. 

Tips

  • Include activities, rituals and routines that have yielded positive benefits in the past. Having a reliable set of habits and routines in your diary reduces decision fatigue, allowing you to focus on elevating your mood and overall wellbeing.

  • Use the notes section of the Self-Care Menu to list resources, such as your go-to YouTube channel for workouts, or your favourite apps for guided meditation. This is your “bookmark” for listing online and offline resources. 

  • Leave room for activities that resonate with you later in the year. You don’t need to fill it all in at once. You can slowly add to it over time, based on your experiences throughout the year. 

Resources

 

Bucket List

Use this space to map out the adventures, experiences and activities you want to try in 2020. 

Consider the following categories: travel, adventure, education, family and physical. 

There are two ways to use the date column.

You can use it to mark in tentative dates or actual dates of completion. The former gives you a timeline to work towards. The latter provides a record of your bucket list achievements. 

Tips

  • Keep it realistic by assessing the time and financial investment involved.

  • Personalise your list and keep it relevant to your interests, goals and values.

  • Include a combination of small, medium and large goals.

  • Share your list with others to keep you socially accountable.

  • Think about whether you want to fly solo or do it with someone else.

Resources

 

Mission Statement

Use this space in your planner to map out your goals for 2020 and beyond.  

1. Review and define

Decide what you really want to achieve in 2020. Start by reviewing the following areas of your life: career, family, health, personal growth. Then, use the Mission Statement section to write down your goals and intentions for the year ahead. A study has shown that you are 42% more likely to achieve your goals simply by writing it down. 

Tip: set SMART goals—Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely.

Examples:

a) Run the Melbourne Marathon in October 2020

b) Buy our first home in Melbourne by December 2020 

 

2. Dig deeper

Think about why you want to pursue each goal. Dig deep to uncover your true motivations. When in doubt, you can flip back to this section of your diary and remember why you started.

Tip: revisit this list and add to it throughout the year. There might be “reasons” that you haven’t yet thought about or consciously admitted. 

Examples:

a) Run the Melbourne Marathon in October 2020 

"It gives me more incentive to be active throughout the week. I really want to improve my fitness and stamina. I want to make new friends in the neighbourhood and this will be the perfect opportunity to join local running groups. I want to raise awareness for mental health. My confidence will improve when I start to see progress. That amazing feeling of accomplishment I’ll feel when I cross the finish line. A sense of pride."

b) Buy our first home in Melbourne by December 2020 

"It’s something we own. Every payment is going towards our mortgage, not someone else’s. We’ll have the freedom to renovate and decorate as we please. More stability. We have enough savings to buy our first home, so it makes financial sense. We want to settle down and start a family. "

 

3. Debunk your fears

Identify the fears that are causing some level of self-doubt. Also consider the fears that have emerged in the past.

The “worst case scenario” exercise allows you to transform your fear of the unknown into something clearly defined and manageable. Once you rationally analyse these scenarios, it becomes clear that there are many things you can do to prevent or repair the potential damage. It allows you to also see other viable pathways to your goal. 

Taking the time to evaluate the cost of inaction can be a powerful source of motivation. It can reveal the emotional, physical and financial impact of abandoning your mission. 

Tip: journal about it and talk to your inner circle as they may be able to lend a different perspective.  

Examples:

a) Run the Melbourne Marathon in October 2020 

Worst case scenarios: knee/ankle injury

Practical steps to prevent these outcomes: invest in the best runners on the market, stretch before and after runs, pace myself and listen to my body—if there are any pains/minor injuries, get it treated immediately. 

Practical steps to repair the damage: see the required specialists, rehab. I’ve also got health insurance which will cover most of it. 


b) Buy our first home in Melbourne by December 2020 

Worst case scenarios: losing my job and not being able to make mortgage repayments

Practical steps to prevent these outcomes: create an emergency savings fund—$x is transferred to this account every month for emergencies only, get mortgage insurance, ensure my resume/LinkedIn is up to date, upskill to improve employability, proactively ask my managers for feedback so that I can continuously improve and be seen as an asset to the company. 

Practical steps to repair the damage: use my emergency savings fund or mortgage insurance while I search for another job. Apply for jobs via LinkedIn/Seek. Freelance while I search for a full time job. I’ve already made several connections in the industry which I can leverage.

 

4. Break it down

Determine the primary steps you need to take in order to complete your mission. This can be relatively broad steps or more specific to-dos. Setting realistic target dates will also help you prioritise and focus on what is most important, allowing you to better manage your time throughout the year. 

Tip: use the Mission in Progress section located on each Pre Week Planner to break down the larger steps into smaller tasks.  

a) Run the Melbourne Marathon in October 2020 

The first few steps might include the following:

Register for the marathon

Research beginners training plan

Research best foods to eat before, during and after running

Invest in proper running gear


b) Buy our first home in Melbourne by December 2020 

The first few steps might include the following:

Speak to our accountant and mortgage broker

Figure out potential suburbs 

Figure out how much we can borrow

Determine budget

Create savings plan

 

5. Celebrate your progress

Set realistic milestones. This allows you to break down your mission into smaller goals. Reaching each milestone is an indication of significant progress which should be acknowledged and celebrated. 

Tip: use your Curation sticker set to mark your progress in your weekly spread.

a) Run the Melbourne Marathon in October 2020 

Milestone #1 Running 10km 

Milestone #2 Running 20km 

Milestone #3 Running 30km 

Milestone #4 Completing the Melbourne Marathon 


b) Buy our first home in Melbourne by December 2020 

Milestone #1 Have savings for a deposit 

Milestone #2 Pre-approval

Milestone #3 Bidding at our first auction

Milestone #4 Putting the sold sticker on

Bonus Tips:

  • Seek out people who have already done what you want to do and learn from them.

  • Stay open minded and flexible in your approach. Be prepared to modify your plan of action. Your mission may change as you grow and that’s okay. 

Resources:

 

Habit Curator

Use this space to workshop your habits and establish a game plan for building habits that stick. 

1. Review and define 

Define the habit you want to build and be specific in your definition by including a daily or weekly minimum. You may choose to include rules like holiday and sick day exceptions.

Tip: Make a plan for exactly when and where you will complete your new habit to alleviate decision fatigue. This formula can be helpful: [behaviour] at [time] in [location].

Examples:

a) Meditate daily for 10 minutes at 7am in my bedroom

b) Run 5km at 7am around Albert Park 3 times a week

c) Practise 1 hour of yoga 3 times a week at Ihana Yoga 

 

2. Dig deeper

Elaborate on why each habit is important to you and why it deserves your time and energy. Be 100% honest. This list is just for you. The reasons listed will help keep you motivated and determined.

Tip: Educate yourself on the short and long-term benefits and consider the negative consequences of not adopting this habit. You can also revisit this list and add to it throughout the year. 

Examples:

a) Meditate daily for 10 minutes at 7am in my bedroom
This will be my daily reminder to slow down and check in with my mind and body. This will help me listen to my body and my needs. If I don’t build this habit, I will continue feeling stressed, tense and unable to tune into the needs of my body. 

b) Run 5km at 7am around Albert Park 3 times a week
Running helps me release any pent up energy and emotion. It gives me clarity, perspective and focus. I always feel energised afterwards. Running will also increase my stamina and strengthen my muscles over time. 

c) Practise 1 hour of yoga 3 times a week at Ihana Yoga
Yoga is medicine for my mind, body and spirit. It strengthens my muscles, increases my flexibility, alleviates my back pain and helps me stay present for a whole hour. It also calms me down and gives me a sense of peace. 

 

3. Identify your trigger(s)

Triggers (cues) are internal or external prompts that the brain strongly associates with a particular habit, like an object, pre-existing routine, specific time, location, emotional state or another person. What are some cues you can put in place to remind you to take action? Can you set up automatic reminders or leave certain objects around to remind you. 

Tip: choose triggers that are specific, consistent, automatic and unavoidable. 

a) Meditate daily for 10 minutes at 7am in my bedroom
Trigger: recurring alarm that goes off at 7am

b) Run 5km at 7am around Albert Park 3 times a week
Triggers: opening my diary every day and seeing “5km run” listed on the habit tracker, recurring alarm at 7am that says “how many runs have you done this week?” 

c) Practise 1 hour of yoga 3 times a week at Ihana Yoga
Triggers: opening my diary every day and seeing “yoga” listed on the habit tracker, yoga mat by the door

 

4. Break it down

Think about the steps required to complete your habit on any given day. How can you simplify or minimise the number of steps involved?

Tip: eliminate “in the moment” decision making by making decisions ahead of time

a) Meditate daily for 10 minutes at 7am in my bedroom

Steps: grab phone > search for app > open app > choose meditation > press play > meditate 

You can eliminate “searching for app” by positioning it on the front screen and you can also choose your meditation in advance if you want to keep this habit as streamlined as possible. 

b) Run 5km at 7am around Albert Park 3 times a week

Steps: search for activewear in wardrobe > change into running gear > put runners on > grab headphones > choose song/playlist > start running

You can eliminate “searching for activewear in wardrobe” by putting it out the night before. You can also make sure your headphones are in a highly accessible location (by the front door perhaps) so you’re not searching for them. You can also create a running playlist in advance to eliminate “in the moment” decision making. 

c) Practise 1 hour of yoga 3 times a week at Ihana Yoga

Steps: Search for activewear in wardrobe > Get dressed > Fill up drink bottle > Grab mat from study > Put shoes on > Drive to yoga (10 minutes) > Park car > Walk to studio > Practise yoga

You can eliminate “searching for activewear in wardrobe” by putting it out the night before. You can keep your yoga mat by the front door so it is highly accessible or you could keep it at the yoga studio for extra convenience. 

 

5. Choose your reward

What will be your immediate reward for completing your habit on any given day? Think about all the everyday activities that you actually enjoy and which ones you could repurpose into rewards to reinforce your habit. It might be jumping on social media or watching netflix. 

Tip: when choosing rewards, make sure it’s consistent with the person you want to be. Completing your gym routine and rewarding yourself with a pack of chips and a can of coke might not be ideal if you’re striving to be the healthiest version of yourself. 

a) Meditate daily for 10 minutes at 7am in my bedroom
Reward: checking Instagram 

b) Run 5km at 7am around Albert Park 3 times a week
Reward: getting a coffee from my local cafe

c) Practise 1 hour of yoga 3 times a week at Ihana Yoga
Reward: indulging in a little healthy treat (like a bliss ball) from the cafe next door. 

 

Habit Prep

What actions do you need to take before you can effectively build this habit. This might include investing in certain tools, doing some research or purchasing a membership. Just make sure your preparation doesn’t turn into procrastination. 

a) Meditate daily for 10 minutes at 7am in my bedroom
Prep: research the best meditation apps, download/purchase subscription, set recurring alarm. 

b) Run 5km at 7am around Albert Park 3 times a week
Prep: buy a good pair of runners and create running playlist

c) Practise 1 hour of yoga 3 times a week at Ihana Yoga
Prep: research yoga studios, sign up for a membership, buy appropriate activewear for yoga

Lastly, use the Habit Tracker on each Weekly Spread to track and record your progress. 

Tips:

  • Announce your intentions to family and friends to keep you accountable and enlist their support.

  • Start small. The idea is to make your habit so easy in the beginning that you can’t say no. 

Resources:

 

Savings Curator 

Use the Savings Curator to provide an overview of your current financial situation and create a practical and realistic savings plan. 

1. Set yourself a target and deadline

A deadline will help you work backwards to map out a realistic savings plan.  

 

2. Assess your current financial activity 

Review your bank/credit card transactions and input your monthly income and expenses. 

Tip: Use a greylead pencil and categorise your expenses into categories so that you don’t end up using all the space for one expense category.

 

3. Calculate your monthly surplus

To calculate your monthly surplus, subtract your total monthly expenses from your total monthly income. This is how much ($) you have leftover without making any changes. 

 

4. Optimise your budget

Analyse your monthly expenditure and search for expenses you can realistically reduce or eliminate each month. For example, if your average monthly takeaway expense is $100 and you decide to reduce it to $70, you can add $70 in the Desired column next to Takeaway.

 

5. Calculate your desired monthly surplus

Once you add your revised expenses to the ‘desired’ column, calculate your desired monthly surplus. This is how much ($) you would have left over if you committed to the changes identified in step 4. 

 

6. Work out your game plan

List the actions you intend on taking to reach your desired monthly surplus. For example, bringing lunch to work instead of eating out may save you an average of $140 per month and cycling to work instead of catching an Uber may save you $160 per month. 

 

7. Commit to your savings plan

Decide how much ($) you are willing to contribute each month. 

 

8. Track your progress

Take note of your monthly deposits and visually track your progress using the progress bar provided. The act of shading in the progress bar can serve as a healthy source of motivation and help you stay on track with your goal, especially since the finish line is visible. If you are struggling to adhere to your desired budget, you may need to revise this accordingly. 

Tip: Set up scheduled transfers or reminders in Curation once you decide how much you are willing to contribute each month. 

 

Monthly Planner

Use the monthly planner to mark important dates, key events and monthly reminders. This provides you with a visual overview/birds eye view of what to expect in the coming months. 

Tip: use your Curation Sticker Set to make your monthly planner more meaningful at a glance. 

 

Pre Week Planner

Use this space to reflect on the previous week and mentally prepare for the next seven days. It’s a great opportunity to identify your priorities and allocate your time strategically.

 

Gratitude Reflection

End and start the week on a high note by writing down at least three things you’re grateful for or three wins from the last seven days. 

  1. Got some positive feedback from my manager

  2. Family time 

  3. Exercising every morning this week! 

 

Drawing Board

The drawing board is your space to define. Use this additional space to scribble your thoughts, brainstorm ideas for a new project or sketch a weekly masterpiece.

Other ideas:

  • Weekly journal entry 

  • Shopping list

  • Meeting notes

  • Affirmations or favourite quotes

  • Weekly budget

 

Your Cue

Jump out of your comfort zone and try something new each week with Your Cue (your weekly challenge). It may challenge your current routines, habits, rituals and way of thinking, but it’s an opportunity to grow, broaden your perspective and possibly add to your knowledge bank. 

Tip: schedule it into your week and list the post-challenge benefits you are likely to experience. This can be your fuel for following through. 

 

Mission in Progress

Review the goals you’ve chosen to pursue this year. Are you on track? Do you need to modify your plan of action? 

Refer to the steps you’ve listed under each mission and identify the sub-tasks that you can realistically tackle in the coming week. Write them down in this section. These are your priorities/goals for the week. 

Tips:

  • Consider the time investment required and schedule these tasks into your weekly spread to keep it top of mind.

  • Review your to-do list from the previous week to determine if there are any remaining tasks that still need to be ticked off. 

 

Weekly Menu

Plan your meals in advance to save yourself time, money and mid-week tantrums. Planning your meals in advance can reduce daily decision fatigue and help you make more mindful food choices without the pressure of a grumbling belly. 

The weekly menu provides adequate space to plan your breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks. 

Tips:

  • Turn this into a weekly ritual. For example, you could plan your meals every Sunday morning as you eat your breakfast or sip on a cup of tea.

  • Use your weekly meal plan to generate a shopping list. 

  • Consider using leftovers from dinner for lunch. 

  • Prepare a list of your favourite breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack ideas that you can use as a reference to avoid starting from scratch each week. You can create this list under the Notes section of Curation. 

  • Be aware of the preparation and cook time. Consider your daily agenda and choose your recipes accordingly. For example, if Tuesday is going to be particularly busy, try choosing a recipe that doesn’t require a long preparation and cook time. 

Resources:

 

Weekly Spread

Use the Weekly Spread to record personal, family and social commitments, to-dos, events and reminders. 

Tips:

  • Use the left side to record social events, meetings and appointments, and the right side for your daily to-do list. 

  • Create custom headings above each column to complement your planning style. 

  • Use your Curation Sticker Set to log weekly commitments, events and milestones. These visual cues help make the weekly spreads in your diary more meaningful at a glance. 

 

Daily self-care planner 

Strategically positioned at the very top of your to-do list, the heart symbol is your reminder to schedule in a daily self-care activity that focuses on nourishing your mind and body. 

Tips:

 

Reminders / notes 

This space can be used for reminders, like paying your vehicle registration or picking up your dry cleaning. Alternatively, you can use this space for weekly mantras or motivational words of wisdom. 

 

Habit tracker 

The Habit Tracker provides a visual display of your progress and draws awareness to the habits that require a bit more attention. Checking off your habits is not only rewarding, it can be a daily source of motivation when you open up your diary. 

It’s up to you how you want to “tick off” your habits. You could use a tick or shade in the circle to indicate that you’ve completed a habit.

Tips:

  • Highlight the days that are relevant to your habits.

  • Assign each habit a number or letter so that you don’t need to rewrite your habits on each weekly spread. Alternatively, shorten the description, so “meditating for 10 minutes daily” is just “meditate” on your Habit Tracker. 

 

2020 Reflection

Reflect on the year that’s been and perform an 80/20 analysis, using the journaling prompts provided. This exercise will provide a new wave of clarity which will help you establish priorities for the year ahead. 

Tips:

  • Don’t rush it. Invest an hour or two, free from distraction, to complete this section of your diary. 

  • Be 100% honest with yourself. This can be a private exercise. 

If you’ve found other ways to personalise your Curation 2020 diary, let us know so we can share your ideas with fellow Curation users.